Skip navigation

740994524_4887c726dc

Many skyscrapers were created because of an original need for additional office space. Architects decided to build upward to satisfy the demand in urban areas so more people could take advantage of the resources that cities had to offer. One of the original towers created was the Monadnock building in Chicago, which still stands today at 15 stories, not high by today’s standards but was extreme for the time. Designed by Daniel Burnham and John Wellborn Root, this building was built with solid brick on the outer walls that was measured at six feet thick. Burnham and Root wanted to use metal instead of this thickness of brick but their clients did not trust this method. It was too extreme for the time period.

Eventually, Chicago architects began using office blocks with a skeleton entirely comprised of metal. Using metal for buildings faced a minor setback due to its expense at the time. Once steel became less expensive to produce and more widely available in the 1880’s, office towers began to grow taller and taller. The first architects to accept and visually accentuate this vertical character were Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan in Chicago. They began constructing 10 story buildings, which eventually grew larger. Later, Sullivan designed the Carson Pirie Scott department store building in Chicago which is now one of the most famous buildings in the city.

This type of architecture with the vertical character became known as the Chicago School. The main characteristic is the innovative steel-frame construction. Chicago School buildings have been praised as important precursors to 20th-century steel and glass skyscrapers. This construction made Chicago known as the birthplace of the first skyscraper. Therefore, this style of architecture that was invented in Chicago advanced the Modernism movement by aiding many of the skyscrapers designs created around the world.

– Jeremy

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: